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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Re: Halloween Retrospective: Katara, The Puppetmaster
« Last post by longman on November 06, 2017, 10:46:37 AM »
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Well, I'd say the reason the Energybending was a moral victory was because of the wider results of killing Ozai. Assassinating him wouldn't have brought about a new era of peace because it would be more death. Aang mastering Energybending puts him on a different level than the rest of the world, and specifically shows him having power of the source of everyone else's power.

Essentially, in my metaphor about everyone's body being considered a church, Aang is Elijah showing that Yahweh commands the weather while Ozai are the impotent priests of Ba'al. It's a small religious war.

Actually I get this (great analogy with the Elijah story!), but to the show's detriment, only the excellent direction of the energybending scene conveys any of this.  My point was that as long as we're using transcendental magic to resolve moral dilemmas about taking life, what about the other magical options? (Bloodbending is a 'better' version of Aang's 'gluebending' suggestion for dealing with Ozai) It's admittedly a mechanical approach, but one that was kinda encouraged by the plot.

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Interesting point about LoK and the Bloodbending dynasty. I'm not sure the story really was intended to be implying that, but it messed up enough other things that its intentions are murky at best.

Yeahj that line was just my glib interpretation. The bloodbending example demonstrates a key difference in ATLA and LoK's use of magic, and a major flaw in the latter that I don't see discussed often. LoK often adulates magic to the expense of its human themes, and this is because Bryke were thinking about magic in a mechanical sense, not a thematic one. Book Air's bloodbending worked as a foil for Korra's powers, but it did little for the story we thought we were watching; infact it was a poor substitute for the fact that nobody had thought about how the bender-nonbender conflict could arise naturally from the setting.

I think it's worth noting that the Avatar world's impression of bloodbending is basically shaped by Katara, given she's the one character who learns, condemns, and then outlaws the art. As the moral voice of the original series she often takes a hard stance against "playing dirty" and losing one's humanity; see her opposition to activating the Avatar state intentionally at the beginning of Book Two. Bloodbending might also hold special significance for Katara because it forces her to lose control of her bending, just like chi-blocking, which she admitted she was "scared" of in "The Chase." (I would imagine she stills display an aversion to chi-blocking even after it becomes a staple of the Kyoshi Warriors; bit of a missed opportunity for the comics.)
That's a plausible theory. The NWT could have had prior knowledge of the bloodbending technique long before Hama, and possibly disconnected from her's and Katara's traumatic experience.  That said, its kinda hard to justify its gross violation of individual autonomy. More the martial art form is 'unnatural' and lacks the dignity and beauty of the conventional forms. That is possibly an independent judgment of the practice from Katara.
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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Re: Halloween Retrospective: Katara, The Puppetmaster
« Last post by Wordbender on November 04, 2017, 10:49:40 PM »
I think it's worth pointing out that, although Katara specifically said she wanted to learn the Southern style of Waterbending, we never see Hama teaching that to her. All of the techniques were created by Hama in response to her captivity, and are only useful in the Fire Nation. Pulling water from flowers obviously wouldn't work at the South Pole, and pulling water from the air to make sharp nails would require a humid atmosphere.

So, when Katara allows Hama to be carted off at the end, I think it's because she recognizes that Hama is no longer a connection to the Southern ways. Hama is only about hurting the Fire Nation.

Yeah, there was nothing left to save. The original Hama was long gone, destroyed by the Fire Nation; and worse, this monstrous version would potentially live on in Katara.

You guys make a good point about Hama being beyond redemption, but she hasn't been completely severed from Southern culture. Let's not forget that she hangs onto her water tribe comb and knows how to prepare delicacies for Sokka and Katara. I think Hama represents the perversion, not absence, of Southern heritage; and Katara's transition from fascination to horror regarding Hama, besides the obvious motivation, is an interesting parallel with Katara's own tendency to internalize negative feelings like her grief for her mother.

I'd also like to mention that as far as North & South goes, I thought the plot was rubbish, especially the bit with the two little girls, but I actually liked Katara's arc itself. It felt like a nice capper on her feelings about her mother's death; she let go of her negative emotions at the end of The Southern Raiders, and finally achieved positive emotions at the end of North & South. Too bad the rest of the comic was lazy nonsense.

I appreciated the plot a lot better when all the threads came together in Part Three, especially Katara's arc, like you. Overall though, it's hard to ignore the anachronisms like snowmobiles and oil refineries and the rather absurd situations the writers invented. (If it's not possible to survive on the other side of the Bridge of Death, then why did they build a bridge?!)

Unfortunately, there's one glaring plot hole in Katara's story that really bothers me. The original series seems to imply that knowledge of the Southern Raiders' mission died with Kya. Otherwise Katara would have been actively discouraged from bending instead of simply being written off as someone with "weird magical powers," since reports of a new generation of waterbenders could have attracted the renewed attention of the Fire Nation. So it's not clear why the kids were warned not to bend while Katara wasn't.

I've also been long intrigued by the difference between the fandom's reaction to Bloodbending, versus the tone set in this episode and continued on into Legend of Korra. The cartoons basically treat Bloodbending as The Worst Thing, while fans point out various ways it could be useful for medical purposes, or situations where even robbing someone of their bodily control could be preferable to the alternative. I've come to think that part of that is how closely tied together the spiritual and the physical are in the Avatar world; magic power comes from martial arts, and the Guru was able to achieve long life through his spirituality. Nature has protective Spirits that can be harmed by damage to the environment, similar to Shintoism.

I think it's worth noting that the Avatar world's impression of bloodbending is basically shaped by Katara, given she's the one character who learns, condemns, and then outlaws the art. As the moral voice of the original series she often takes a hard stance against "playing dirty" and losing one's humanity; see her opposition to activating the Avatar state intentionally at the beginning of Book Two. Bloodbending might also hold special significance for Katara because it forces her to lose control of her bending, just like chi-blocking, which she admitted she was "scared" of in "The Chase." (I would imagine she stills display an aversion to chi-blocking even after it becomes a staple of the Kyoshi Warriors; bit of a missed opportunity for the comics.)
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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Re: Halloween Retrospective: Katara, The Puppetmaster
« Last post by Loopy on November 04, 2017, 05:09:56 PM »
Well, I'd say the reason the Energybending was a moral victory was because of the wider results of killing Ozai. Assassinating him wouldn't have brought about a new era of peace because it would be more death. Aang mastering Energybending puts him on a different level than the rest of the world, and specifically shows him having power of the source of everyone else's power.

Essentially, in my metaphor about everyone's body being considered a church, Aang is Elijah showing that Yahweh commands the weather while Ozai are the impotent priests of Ba'al. It's a small religious war.

Interesting point about LoK and the Bloodbending dynasty. I'm not sure the story really was intended to be implying that, but it messed up enough other things that its intentions are murky at best.
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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Re: Halloween Retrospective: Katara, The Puppetmaster
« Last post by longman on November 04, 2017, 11:58:05 AM »
I think it's worth pointing out that, although Katara specifically said she wanted to learn the Southern style of Waterbending, we never see Hama teaching that to her. All of the techniques were created by Hama in response to her captivity, and are only useful in the Fire Nation. Pulling water from flowers obviously wouldn't work at the South Pole, and pulling water from the air to make sharp nails would require a humid atmosphere.

So, when Katara allows Hama to be carted off at the end, I think it's because she recognizes that Hama is no longer a connection to the Southern ways. Hama is only about hurting the Fire Nation.
Yeah, there was nothing left to save. The original Hama was long gone, destroyed by the Fire Nation; and worse, this monstrous version would potentially live on in Katara.



Quote
I've also been long intrigued by the difference between the fandom's reaction to Bloodbending, versus the tone set in this episode and continued on into Legend of Korra. The cartoons basically treat Bloodbending as The Worst Thing, while fans point out various ways it could be useful for medical purposes, or situations where even robbing someone of their bodily control could be preferable to the alternative. I've come to think that part of that is how closely tied together the spiritual and the physical are in the Avatar world; magic power comes from martial arts, and the Guru was able to achieve long life through his spirituality. Nature has protective Spirits that can be harmed by damage to the environment, similar to Shintoism.

So to take control of someone's body, to force it to move and do things against a person's will, is equivalent to going to a Christian church to perform a human sacrifice to Satan. (I'm make that reference because I'm Catholic. Everyone can feel free to substitute an example representative of their own beliefs.) In that light, I can see how it's something people wouldn't even want to think about, even as a possibility for good.

I think fandom theories about bloodbending utility in the Avatar world make sense with respect to
1) LoK's Book Air, where bending was more commodified and lacked the spiritual context of ATLA; and
2) The ATLA series finale. If Aang reaching into Ozai's spirit and cutting off his firebending is a moral victory, then why isn't incapacitation via bloodbending also acceptable?

That second point touches on the awkward tussle between magic and human themes in fantasy epics, and it is interesting to see how The Runaway and Book Air worked this out with bloodbending. In the former (and later in The Southern Raiders, it is clear that the incidence of bloodbending is really about the ethics of vengeance and warfare, whereas in Book Air the story of privilege and oppression in urban dystopia was really about a would-be dynasty of OP bloodbenders.
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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Re: Halloween Retrospective: Katara, The Puppetmaster
« Last post by Loopy on November 02, 2017, 08:03:58 PM »
Nice! I'm obviously way behind on my own Retrospective thread, but I just not had the free time to even do those smaller write-ups to kick things off. I'm glad you gave us this Halloween treat!

I think it's worth pointing out that, although Katara specifically said she wanted to learn the Southern style of Waterbending, we never see Hama teaching that to her. All of the techniques were created by Hama in response to her captivity, and are only useful in the Fire Nation. Pulling water from flowers obviously wouldn't work at the South Pole, and pulling water from the air to make sharp nails would require a humid atmosphere.

So, when Katara allows Hama to be carted off at the end, I think it's because she recognizes that Hama is no longer a connection to the Southern ways. Hama is only about hurting the Fire Nation.

I've also been long intrigued by the difference between the fandom's reaction to Bloodbending, versus the tone set in this episode and continued on into Legend of Korra. The cartoons basically treat Bloodbending as The Worst Thing, while fans point out various ways it could be useful for medical purposes, or situations where even robbing someone of their bodily control could be preferable to the alternative. I've come to think that part of that is how closely tied together the spiritual and the physical are in the Avatar world; magic power comes from martial arts, and the Guru was able to achieve long life through his spirituality. Nature has protective Spirits that can be harmed by damage to the environment, similar to Shintoism.

So to take control of someone's body, to force it to move and do things against a person's will, is equivalent to going to a Christian church to perform a human sacrifice to Satan. (I'm make that reference because I'm Catholic. Everyone can feel free to substitute an example representative of their own beliefs.) In that light, I can see how it's something people wouldn't even want to think about, even as a possibility for good.

I'd also like to mention that as far as North & South goes, I thought the plot was rubbish, especially the bit with the two little girls, but I actually liked Katara's arc itself. It felt like a nice capper on her feelings about her mother's death; she let go of her negative emotions at the end of The Southern Raiders, and finally achieved positive emotions at the end of North & South. Too bad the rest of the comic was lazy nonsense.
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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Halloween Retrospective: Katara, The Puppetmaster
« Last post by Wordbender on October 31, 2017, 11:57:53 PM »
The end of October signals, at long last, the end of summer. We leave behind the blistering heat and sunshine for shorter and cooler days. Around the neighborhood, houses are decorated with spooky decorations and holiday lights. Talk revolves around what everyone did during the weekend before Halloween, and what they plan to do the night of.

For myself, Halloween is an occasion both to look inward and to look outward. Hiding in the darkness from trick-or-treaters, I pause to reflect on my own life, the changing weather, and the onset of winter. Yet the spectacle of Halloween is also a unique opportunity to observe the community—for one night, everyone roams around without concern for routine or relationships. Even as we hide behind our masks and costumes, we get a feel for “who’s who” in the neighborhood.



Speaking of “who’s who,” Halloween is also a fitting time to examine ATLA’s creepiest Halloween episode: “The Puppetmaster.” For the task, I enlisted the help of someone I shall call Arthur, a fellow Avatar fan.

“It’s good to be here with you, Wordbender,” said Arthur.

“And you as well. Let’s get right to it—‘The Puppetmaster’ is a very intriguing and thrilling episode, definitely one of my favorites of Book Three, as well as the entire series.”

“Yeah, mine too. The story line is so well done, and it’s cool to see ATLA go dark.”

“Well, I’m not sure if I’d single out this episode,” I said. “The show deals with some pretty heavy themes over its entire course. Even back in Book One, despite how often that season is bashed for being slapstick.”

“Perhaps so,” replied Arthur. “You had Aang’s loss of his family, his civilization, and his entire culture. Then there’s the moral dilemmas faced by Katara when she caused Haru’s imprisonment and when she stole the waterbending scroll. And twice Sokka dealt with love and then loss of that love.”

“Indeed,” I said. “And in a similar vein, ‘Puppetmaster’ deals with another moral dilemma—the existence of bloodbending. But this episode is particularly striking, and I think it’s because of the atmosphere…”

“That’s what it is. The atmosphere is executed so well. The trees are crooked, the villagers give off paranoia, and the nighttime scenes are menacingly lit, whether by campfire or moonlight. There’s an unsettling motif played throughout the episode’s most dramatic moments, particularly when Hama finally begins to bloodbend. And the buildup to that moment is so intense and fast-paced.”



“All of that is true,” I said. “But there’s more to ‘Puppetmaster’ than the technicals, how well it unfolds the mystery. Others have no doubt covered that, probably far more competently than we could. I say we should turn toward the key themes of the episode; and in the spirit of ‘who’s who,’ I think we should do that by examining Katara.”

“Katara? Why so?”

“Why, she is central to the episode,” I said. “’Puppetmaster’ opens with a flashback, the only one in Book Three. And it’s of Katara rediscovering the art of waterbending. We’re reminded she was the only bender in the South Pole, which had itself become a pale shadow of its former glory after Fire Nation raids. She discovers the connection between waterbending and the Moon in the North Pole, then discovers that she can bend sweat. We’re learning all of this through Katara’s eyes.”

“And I suppose that sets the stage for the rest,” said Arthur. “Katara forms an instant bond with Hama, and sees similarities between Gran-Gran and Hama before Katara is even aware that she is also from the Southern Tribe. She trusts Hama to teach her waterbending, and eventually that trust is betrayed—not unlike Katara’s relationships with Jet and Zuko.”

“Quite so,” I said. “So if you want to understand ‘The Puppetmaster,’ you have to understand what’s going on with Katara.”

“Ok, it’s agreed,” said Arthur. “Let’s start with her relationship to bending. For Katara, it’s not just an art. It’s a connection to her lost water tribe culture and a key part of her identity, which is why she gets so defensive about it.”

“Of course.”

“So Hama offers to teach her some waterbending, and Katara is thrilled, just as she was driven to learn from the waterbending scroll and then from Pakku. And in Hama, Katara has the opportunity to learn about the Southern style that was nearly wiped out. When she says it would mean everything to her, she really means it.”

“But as much as Hama inspires Katara, it quickly becomes clear that Hama is hiding some ominous secrets,” I started. “First, she reveals she was last bender captured by the Fire Nation (in that sense, she was Katara at one point, the Southern Tribe’s last waterbender), and then politely refuses to elaborate on her escape. Then she actually starts to bend with Katara, and they destroy some fire lilies in the process, which, given her facial expression, Katara finds a little unsettling…”

“Oh yeah, the lilies,” said Arthur. “You know, they’re an interesting form of symbolism. Because on one level, they sort of represent the people of the Fire Nation, and how Katara doesn’t want to harm the innocent—I mean, being the Painted Lady and all.”

“Naturally,” I said.

“And then there’s also the aspect of beauty. The existence of the fire lilies suggests there is beauty in the Fire Nation, and that its people are not all bad. But Hama doesn’t see things that way.”



“As far as she’s concerned, they people of the Fire Nation are the enemy.”

“That’s right. She doesn’t distinguish. Hama uses innocent villagers to exact her own form of revenge.”

“And Katara is horrified,” I said. “Not just because Hama starts to bloodbend her, but horrified at the mere concept of controlling other people with waterbending. It’s the dark side of the art, if you will.”

“Yes, and since we’ve agreed that waterbending and culture are one in the same for Katara, then bloodbending also represents the dark side of the Southern Tribe,” said Arthur, “which has been nearly exterminated by the war. Bloodbending is the consequence of the desire for revenge. Dare I say it, but this ties in neatly with the latest Avatar comic, North and South.”

I groaned.

“Bear with me here—it’s canon. In that comic we see the natural results of the war from the Southern Tribe’s perspective, even if we don’t necessarily agree with how it was written. In a way, that entire plot started with Hama.”

“Perhaps,” I said. “But to get back to ‘Puppetmaster,’ it’s interesting how quickly Katara’s relationship with Hama breaks down. For most of the episode, she’s entranced with Hama, this living relic of the Southern Tribe. And then the bloodbending begins and Katara basically kicks her to the curb. She doesn’t flinch when Hama, her only connection to the Southern waterbending style, is carted off to prison.”

“Doesn’t flinch? She was in tears after fighting Hama,” said Arthur. “And anyway, it’s a 24-minute episode. The story has to move quickly.”

“But why was she crying? Not because of the intensity of the fight, but because of what Hama pointed out: Katara is a bloodbender too now.”

“Sure.”

“As is quite clear, this isn’t a so-called ‘gift’ she wants to have, the same twisted power as Hama. But it’s not just about a single waterbending ability. I would suggest to Katara, Hama presents a capacity to do evil that she doesn’t want to acknowledge within herself.”

“Now, clarify that,” said Arthur.

“Through bloodbending, Katara has the ability to do morally reprehensible actions with her waterbending. And when confronted with that possibility, she sort of shuts down. First, she refuses to learn the power, and then after Hama forces her to, she wants Hama locked away forever.”

“To generalize this to water tribe culture,” said Arthur, “part of her arc in North and South involves coming to terms with her nostalgia for her childhood. She denies that the factious, divided Southern Tribe seen post-series could be at all reflective of the tribe when she was growing up. She was denies that her tribe was innately capable of conflict.”

“Interesting connection, comics aside,” I said, smiling. “How about Katara’s grief over her mother? Her death is brought up twice in this episode—first at the campfire, and then when Katara comforts Hama. Both times, Aang and Sokka glance at her worryingly. They know it’s a sore spot for her. But Katara doesn’t miss a beat; she’s incredibly resilient. At least, until ‘Southern Raiders,’ when her grief comes to a head, and she chooses to track down the man responsible.

“So in summary,” I continued, “Katara has a tremendous capacity for emotion. We don’t call her the heart of the series for nothing. But she’s so strong-willed and so good at hiding her feelings—until something pushes her over the top. In ‘Puppetmaster,’ it’s Hama demonstrating that Katara does have the capacity for evil, for vengeance.”



“Let’s take the idea further,” said Arthur. “Katara’s relationship to her father. Before ‘Crossroads of Destiny,’ she didn’t seem to mind giving up her opportunity to see him again by staying in Ba Sing Se with the Earth King. Of course, in ‘The Awakening,’ we find out that’s not really the case. She felt abandoned by Hakoda in the same way she felt abandoned by Aang. Quite a reversal.”

“And her relationship with Aang,” I added. “There’s one scene at the end of ‘Serpent’s Passs’ that always struck me—Aang tells Katara that she gives him hope, happiness, and love. And she tears up. She’s spent the entire episode comforting Aang and the others, holding the group together; why should she care so much? (This obviously flies in the face of certain fan theories, which assert that Aang was abusive in that he developed a one-way dependence on Katara.) I think, as the group wandered aimlessly through the desert and as Aang began to suppress his own emotions, that she really began to lose hope in herself. Katara just didn’t show it. Aang restored her self-confidence.”

“Not to mention,” said Arthur, “her infamous reaction to Aang’s kiss in ‘Day of Black Sun.’ She brushes it aside and pretends as if it never happened—throughout the second half of Book Three, and in the ‘Love is a Battlefield’ comic. Does she not like Aang? Hardly—we’re given many hints of her affection throughout the series. But her overarching goal is to end the war. So she behaves as if she and Aang are not really that close; that Aang could not really be struck down by Fire Lord Ozai. But that doesn’t mean Katara herself doesn’t recognize that either might be true.”

“Katara, for all her passion, is such a difficult character to read,” I said. “She presents a facade of optimism and strength even under the most difficult circumstances—but we can never be quite sure how she really feels.”

“And never,” I added, “get on her bad side.”

“For sure,” chuckled Arthur. “In the end, what makes ‘The Puppetmaster’ such a good horror episode? Hama’s wickedness? Nope—it’s Katara. Wickedness is a part of Katara’s bending, her identity, whether she likes it or not. Hama is gone, but we’re left wondering what Katara is thinking under her emotional costume and mask.

“She is the scariest character on the show.”



And with that, rain pouring outside (I suppose we were fortunate that a certain waterbender did not freeze it), we finished our spooky exploration of Katara. Happy Halloween, Avatar fans.
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The Lounge / Re: Favorite Fandom Activities
« Last post by CharlesRa on September 14, 2017, 12:57:51 PM »
I just love reading them, I'm not very good at writing them.
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Mixed Media / Re: Anyone else Game Grumps?
« Last post by FartsOfNeil on September 05, 2017, 06:13:50 PM »
Just updated to the latest one.  This month and the next is gonna be busy for me, which is actually good news for this thing cause all the stuff I needs t'git done is pulling me outta my slump.  Don't wanna make promises though...that seems to jinx it. :P
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Art & Photography / Re: The 'farts' stands for fanarts!
« Last post by FartsOfNeil on August 17, 2017, 11:28:00 AM »
Recently I got to have a guest comic for a pretty sauce webcomic called Go Get a Roomie.  So...that was awesome.

Oh and I drew this in response to one of the comments:



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Avatar: The Last Airbender / Re: Tech In ATLA?
« Last post by Wordbender on August 12, 2017, 02:18:13 AM »
As for the cold drink -- note that refrigeration isn't necessary to store ice. For centuries, ice was harvested during winters and stored in ice houses. Cities even had ice deliveries before refrigerators became widespread.

Yes, but in a place that is said to be hot all the time, it seems like refrigeration would be useful.  Do they even have winter in the Fire Nation?


They wouldn't have needed winter, either. Ice can also be harvested in mountains or transported from Fire Nation colonies. In medieval times, ice houses like this were used to store the stuff in warmer climates.

You're right about all those distinctions, but do they make a difference in terms of political power? Certainly within Ba Sing Se and the Fire Nation, but I would argue "not really" for the bulk of the Avatar world. Most people live in quaint villages where the wealthiest, most influential leaders have a strong sense of identity with the entire community. Given a huge luxury like electrification, it's hard to imagine an "I'll have mine, but you can't get yours because you're poor" scenario. This is partially due to the original series' generally lighthearted tone.

Yes, they probably made a difference in the NWT. Hahn was moving up because he was marrying a princess.  He even said he was looking forward to the "perks".  There is obviously something to be gained through betrothal.  In Hahn's case, it might have meant that he would be next in line as Chief.


Let me rephase: there are clearly political and social distinctions, but they make little difference in terms of how resources and technology get allocated to citizens. Again, look at Omashu; there's King Bumi, artisans, merchants, and all sorts of different social classes, yet their mail delivery system -- very spectacular, very efficient, and also very expensive -- still serves the entire city. Let's say Omashu suddenly discovers electricity. Would there be electrified neighborhoods and non-electrified slums? Maybe, but there's no precedent for that in the original series.

Now, regarding the newspaper tech...

Gosh, there's so little to work off of in the series, but I don't think any nation ever had "modern newspapers." For that, you need a modern printing press with movable type, which was not invented until the 15th century (the earliest newspapers came about in the 16th century). The flyers we do get to see, like the "lost Appa" one and the Ember Island Players poster seem to be based on woodblock printing, which was used for centuries in medieval East Asia. That's not to say ATLA-era periodicals are impossible, they would just be prohibitively expensive for anyone but governments to produce en masse. Maybe bending could help in some way.

Which is why they might have only circulated them to the wealthy people living in the Upper Ring.

The flyers they had printed up were paper.
http://piandao.org/screenshots/earth/earth17/earth17-13.jpg
http://piandao.org/screenshots/earth/earth17/earth17-69.jpg

So, not only do they have the tech to mass-produce print, but this service is apparently available to private people.

Woodblock printing is printing with custom-made ink presses, not printing on wood blocks. ;) Movable type is much cheaper and more efficient because you can print a different document by rearranging the characters instead of carving another block.


If you look at the Wikipedia history for movable type in Asia (fascinating stuff), you'll notice the works have much simpler designs than the posters we see in the show. I think the writers just weren't thinking through the printing stuff. I still say the Earth Kingdom didn't have cheap, mass-produced newspapers, but I'm going to hand-wave "regularly produced documents for the nobility" as "maybe."


Really, it's a lot of mental gymnastics to allow people to send fast messages to each other without changing the setting too much. :D


Maybe that's why Hawky was a throwaway joke. ;D
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